May 2nd, 2016 by editor



The mayor of Belfort in eastern France says he does not want his town to play host to Muslim refugees. And he’s not the only one. A number of mayors have said they only wish to host Christian refugees. They claim it is a question of security. More informations: http://www.dw.com/en/program/focus-on-europe/s-101185-9798

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April 8th, 2016 by editor



Unused / unissued material – dates and locations may be unclear / unknown.

Villacoublay Airfield, near Paris, France

LS. A French transport plane, the NC 211 “Cormoran II” (also named the “Flying Wagon”), standing on Villacoublay airfield on 17th April 1949. MS “Cormoran” with smaller aircraft under its wing. CU Three ton truck entering nose of plane up ramp. CU Truck disappearing into the plane, doors closing. MS Pilot Dellys (?) at controls of plane. CU Nose of cargo plane. MS “Cormoran” taking off on her maiden flight ( a tragic accident had happened to the previous model, “Cormoran I”). (2 shots). Aerial shots of “Cormoran” in flight. (2 shots). MS “Cormoran” landing and taxiing in. (2 shots).

Note: “Date received” on original paperwork reads: 19/04/1949.
90,000 historic films, all SEARCHABLE on YouTube at: http://www.youtube.com/britishpathe Join us on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/britishpathe Tweet us @britishpathe FILM ID:2519.24

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April 7th, 2016 by editor



more at: http://scitech.quickfound.net/aviation_news_and_search.html

‘Air Transport has accomplished a great deal to solve the problems of our military forces attempting to be everywhere at once with everything. MATS–Military Air Transport Service–maintains a mobile aerial task force that can move huge numbers of men and vast amounts of supplies to distant frontiers rapidly and efficiently. This week’s THE BIG PICTURE covers four current emergency airlifts to four parts of the globe and goes back in time to show in historical perspective some of the famous airlifts of the past.’

“The Big Picture” episode TV-581

The Big Picture TV Series playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL_hX5wLdhf_Jwfz5l_3NRAcCYURbOW2Fl

Public domain film from the US National Archives, slightly cropped to remove uneven edges, with the aspect ratio corrected, and mild video noise reduction applied.
The soundtrack was also processed with volume normalization, noise reduction, clipping reduction, and/or equalization (the resulting sound, though not perfect, is far less noisy than the original).

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Military_Air_Transport_Service

The Military Air Transport Service (MATS) is an inactive Department of Defense Unified Command. Activated on 1 June 1948, MATS was a consolidation of the United States Navy Naval Air Transport Service (NATS) and the United States Air Force Air Transport Command (ATC) into a single joint command. It was inactivated and discontinued on 8 January 1966 when the Air Force and Navy set up separate strategic airlift commands.

In 1982, the World War II Air Transport Command (ATC) (1942-1948) and the Military Air Transport Service were consolidated with Military Airlift Command (MAC) (1966-1992)…

With the end of World War II, the United States Army Air Forces Air Transport Command found itself in limbo…

The DOD believed it should have its own air transport service and decided that ATC should become the Military Air Transport Service (MATS), supported by the Air Force…

Although MATS was under the operational control of the United States Air Force, the United States Navy was a full partner in the command and operational components of the organization…

Air Force pilots flew Navy MATS planes, just as naval aviators could be found piloting Air Force MATS transport aircraft…

Korean War (1950–1953)…

The MATS role was purely logistical, and operated from the United States to Japan…

Suez, Lebanon and Taiwan Straits Crisis (1956–1958)

During the 1956 Suez Crisis, MATS MATS airlifted 1,300 Colombian and Indian troops from Bogotá and Agra to the United Nations staging area in Naples, Italy, to supplement the UN police force in the Suez area…

Operation Deep Freeze (1957–1963)

In December 1962, MATS Douglas C-124 Globemasters ended six years of seasonal flying as members of the Air Force-Navy team resupplying scientific stations in the Antarctic. During that time the aircraft, operated by the 63d Troop Carrier Wing stationed at Donaldson Air Force Base, South Carolina, air-dropped about 4,000 tons of supplies from the main Antarctic base at McMurdo Sound to remote stations near and at the South Pole. Beginning in 1963, Lockheed C-130E Hercules, newer, faster, and longer range, picked up the MATS portion of the mission…

Cuban Missile Crisis (1962)…

Between 16 October and the end of the month, MATS airlifted thousands of troops and thousands of tons in hundreds of sorties from bases throughout the country into Florida and Guantanamo Bay, Cuba…

Vietnam War

Beginning in 1948, MATS flew airlift missions into French Indochina, providing airlifts of military equipment and supplies to the French government and colonial Vietnamese forces fighting the Viet Minh. In 1954, at the request of the French, wounded Legionnaires from Dien Bien Phu were transported from Tan Son Nhut Airport to either Algeria or France…

Military Airlift Command

On 1 January 1966, as a result of the Navy announcing the withdraw of its components, MATS was rededignated Military Airlift Command…

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March 24th, 2016 by editor



The Big Picture TV Series playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL_hX5wLdhf_Jwfz5l_3NRAcCYURbOW2Fl

On the 25 US Army installations that once were in France. “Scenes of Paris and Orleans are only part of the half-hour documentary, one of a series of THE BIG PICTURE projects designed to show Americans the life of American GIs oversees.”

“The Big Picture” episode TV-328

Public domain film from the US National Archives, slightly cropped to remove uneven edges, with the aspect ratio corrected, and one-pass brightness-contrast-color correction & mild video noise reduction applied.
The soundtrack was also processed with volume normalization, noise reduction, clipping reduction, and/or equalization (the resulting sound, though not perfect, is far less noisy than the original).

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_States_Army_Europe

United States Army Europe (USAREUR) is an Army Service Component Command of the United States Army. It is responsible for directing US Army operations throughout the United States European Command Area of Responsibility. During the Cold War, HQ USAREUR supervised ground formations primarily focused upon the Warsaw Pact militaries to the east as part of the North Atlantic Treaty Organisation’s (NATO) Central Army Group. Since the Revolutions of 1989, USAREUR has greatly reduced its size, dispatched US forces to Operation Desert Shield and Desert Storm, and increased security cooperation with other NATO land forces…

A new joint United States European Command (USEUCOM) was established in Frankfurt, Germany on 1 August 1952. On that day, the Army headquarters at Heidelberg, formerly known as EUCOM, became Headquarters, United States Army, Europe. In 1953, the Korean War Armistice was signed, and tensions began to ease in Europe. About 13,500 soldiers manned each of the USAREUR divisions. New equipment fielded at the time included the M-48 tank, the M-59 armored personnel carrier, and tactical nuclear weapons. On 15 July 1958 USAREUR forces were ordered to assist the Lebanese government. Task Force 201, the Army component of Operation Blue Bat rapidly deployed more than 8,000 Soldiers from Europe to Beirut by air and sea. As the situation quickly stabilized, all U.S. forces redeployed from the country within 4 months.

Although the Korean War, open East-West conflict had ended, political tensions remained high in Europe. Particularly troublesome was the impasse over the Federal Republic of Germany (West Germany, the former British, French and U.S. zones of occupation) and the German Democratic Republic (East Germany, the former Soviet zone of occupation). East Germany [the DDR] was considered by many countries over the years to be nothing more than the Soviet Zone of Occupation; this changed in 1973 with the UN recognition of both Germanies. Berlin posed an additional problem; it was surrounded by East Germany, but Great Britain, France, the United States, and the Soviet Union all occupied sectors in the city. In the early years, travel between the sectors was unrestricted. At the time Soviet premier Nikita Khrushchev announced in June 1961 that the Soviet Union was planning to conclude a peace treaty with the East German government, 3,000 East German refugees flowed daily into Berlin.

Suddenly on the night of 12 August 1961, the Soviets closed the border crossing points and began to construct the Berlin Wall…

…The crisis cooled in Berlin from 1962 to 1963, and augmenting forces returned to the United States. Equipment modernization programs during this period included the M-113 armored personnel carrier, the M-14 rifle, the M-60 machine gun, the OV-1 fixed wing observation aircraft, the UH-1B Huey helicopter, the M-151 truck, and the M-60 tank. In late 1963 Operation BIG LIFT tested the use of prepositioned equipment through redeployment of the 2nd Armored Division to Europe via a single airlift.

On 1 December 1966, the separate Seventh Army headquarters was eliminated, and HQ USAREUR became Headquarters and Headquarters Company, U.S. Army Europe and Seventh Army. At the same time, France withdrew from the military structure of NATO, and U.S. forces were withdrawn from France. The communications zone headquarters moved from Orleans, France, to Worms, Germany, (and later to Kaiserslautern, where as 21st Theater Support Command it remains today). USEUCOM moved to Stuttgart…

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March 13th, 2016 by editor



France.

World War One. Military transportation. Munitions transport in France; near the Somme. Opens with shot of guys in coats; helmets; stacked up bombshells; with trucks parked in BG; the men are carrying the shells back to trucks. Then; a shot of a road: 3 horses (with riders) pulling a cart go by to left; pan to right on soldiers standing by road next to truck; another truck drives past; long row of horse-drawn wagons; pan to boxes stacked at side of road. (This footage & more in longer story; ‘French counteroffensive’)
90,000 historic films, all SEARCHABLE on YouTube at: http://www.youtube.com/britishpathe Join us on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/britishpathe Tweet us @britishpathe FILM ID:1852.5

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March 11th, 2016 by editor



The Vosges, France.

World War One; military. Animals. Rescue work: huskies transport wounded from snow in the Vosges; ca. 1915. 3 French soldiers; dressed in winter clothes; lift wounded soldier onto dog sled; in the snow. Same; from diff. angle: 2 of the huskies in FG; tied to sled; where the men are arranging the man so that he’s leaning back on the sled. Next; shot of the dog sled moving; dogs running over the snow; toward camera; then turning. Another shot of the sled in motion; trees snow on tree branches. House below; downhill. Next; the 3 men wade through the deep snow; bearing stretcher with the wounded person.
90,000 historic films, all SEARCHABLE on YouTube at: http://www.youtube.com/britishpathe Join us on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/britishpathe Tweet us @britishpathe FILM ID:1852.16

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March 10th, 2016 by editor



Argonne Forest, France.

World War One. transportation; animals. ‘Aerial torpedoes transported by mule to Argonne.’ French troops leading mules on path through forest; walking up hill; toward camera. Yes; indeed; the mules have torpedoes strapped on either side like saddlebags! Strange ancient/modern juxtaposition. Pine trees; snow.
90,000 historic films, all SEARCHABLE on YouTube at: http://www.youtube.com/britishpathe Join us on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/britishpathe Tweet us @britishpathe FILM ID:1852.15

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March 6th, 2016 by editor



more at http://scitech.quickfound.net/aviation_news_and_search.html

Classic airplane crash test film.

FAA film FA-615

see also: DC-7 Crash Test: “Transport Crash Safety Test” 1964 Federal Aviation Administration

Public domain film from the FAA, slightly cropped to remove uneven edges, with the aspect ratio corrected, and mild video noise reduction applied.
The soundtrack was also processed with volume normalization, noise reduction, clipping reduction, and/or equalization (the resulting sound, though not perfect, is far less noisy than the original).

There is a broadband hum in the vocal frequencies of this film which I cannot completely remove.

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lockheed_Constellation

The Lockheed Constellation (“Connie”) is a propeller-driven, four-engined airliner built by Lockheed Corporation between 1943 and 1958 at Burbank, California. 856 were built in numerous models, all with a triple-tail design and dolphin-shaped fuselage and most powered by four 18-cylinder Wright R-3350s. The Constellation was used as a civil airliner and as a military and civil air transport, seeing service in the Berlin Airlift and the Biafran airlift. It was the presidential aircraft for Dwight D. Eisenhower…

Design and development
Initial studies

Lockheed had been working on the L-044 Excalibur, a four-engine pressurized airliner, since 1937. In 1939 Trans World Airlines, at the instigation of major stockholder Howard Hughes, requested a 40-passenger transcontinental airliner with 3,500 mi (5,630 km) range—well beyond the capabilities of the Excalibur design. TWA’s requirements led to the L-049 Constellation, designed by Lockheed engineers including Kelly Johnson and Hall Hibbard. Willis Hawkins, another Lockheed engineer, maintains that the Excalibur program was purely a cover for the Constellation.

Development of the Constellation

The Constellation’s wing design was close to that of the P-38 Lightning, differing mostly in size. The triple-tail kept the aircraft’s height low enough to fit in existing hangars, while features included hydraulically boosted controls and a de-icing system used on wing and tail leading edges. The aircraft had a top speed of over 375 mph (600 km/h), faster than that of a Japanese Zero fighter, a cruise speed of 340 mph (550 km/h), and a service ceiling of 24,000 ft (7,300 m)…

With the onset of World War II, the TWA aircraft entering production were converted to an order for C-69 Constellation military transport aircraft, with 202 aircraft intended for the United States Army Air Forces (USAAF). The first prototype (civil registration NX25600) flew on January 9, 1943, a short ferry hop from Burbank to Muroc Field for testing. Edmund T. “Eddie” Allen, on loan from Boeing, flew left seat, with Lockheed’s own Milo Burcham as copilot. Rudy Thoren and Kelly Johnson were also on board…

The C-69 was mostly used as a high-speed, long-distance troop transport during the war…

After World War II the Constellation came into its own as a fast civil airliner. Aircraft already in production for the USAAF as C-69 transports were finished as civil airliners, with TWA receiving the first on 1 October 1945. TWA’s first transatlantic proving flight departed Washington, DC, on December 3, 1945, arriving in Paris on December 4 via Gander and Shannon.

Trans World Airlines transatlantic service started on February 6, 1946 with a New York-Paris flight in a Constellation. On June 17, 1947 Pan American World Airways opened the first ever scheduled round-the-world service with their L-749 Clipper America. The famous flight “Pan Am 1” operated until 1982.

As the first pressurized airliner in widespread use, the Constellation helped to usher in affordable and comfortable air travel. Operators of Constellations included TWA, Eastern Air Lines, Pan American World Airways, Air France, BOAC, KLM, Qantas, Lufthansa, Iberia Airlines, Panair do Brasil, TAP Portugal, Trans-Canada Air Lines (later renamed Air Canada), Aer Lingus, VARIG, Cubana de Aviación and Línea Aeropostal Venezolana…

Records

Sleek and powerful, Constellations set a number of records. On April 17, 1944, the second production C-69, piloted by Howard Hughes and TWA president Jack Frye, flew from Burbank, California, to Washington, D.C., in 6 hours and 57 minutes..

On September 29, 1957 a TWA L-1649A flew from Los Angeles to London in 18 hours and 32 minutes..

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March 6th, 2016 by editor



Unissued / Unused material.

French Government employees protest against the decision to freeze wages on account of the 5% price cut, the cuts they say are not strictly adhered to. Paris, France.

L/S of the Place de L’Opera, Paris, showing jam of cars in front of it. Various shots cars and buses jammed in the streets. M/S Press Photographers balanced on a traffic light. C/U as a bus driver climbs down from his seat. C/U as the entrance to the subway is closed. Interior L/S of the deserted subway. Various shots everything at standstill. Various shots as workers march through streets.

Cataloguer’s note: date of item: 17/2/1947.
90,000 historic films, all SEARCHABLE on YouTube at: http://www.youtube.com/britishpathe Join us on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/britishpathe Tweet us @britishpathe FILM ID:2128.21

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March 5th, 2016 by editor

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